For innovative teaching in NJ prisons, RU Classics prof Emily Allen-Hornblower wins inaugural Chancellor’s Award for Faculty Excellence

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Professor Emily Allen-Hornblower accepts the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence from Rutgers-New Brunswick Chancellor Richard L. Edwards

Here’s another great Rutgers Classics first. Honored in the inaugural group of seven recipients of Rutgers New Brunswick’s important new faculty award—the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence—is Associate Professor in Classics Emily Allen-Hornblower.

In a ceremony Tuesday 4 October 2016, Chancellor Richard L. Edwards recognized Professor Allen-Hornblower in the category of Excellence in Service.

In presenting the award, Edwards cited “her heartfelt conviction that the Classics are of significance to people in all life situations and her dedication to bringing her scholarship beyond the university classroom to new audiences through her participation in the New Jersey Scholarship and Transformative Education in Prisons program (NJ-STEP)”. Continue reading

On Sunday 13 November, a celebration of composer and Rutgers professor Robert Moevs (1920-2007)

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On Sunday 13 November, Mortensen Hall on our Douglass Campus is the venue for a celebration of composer Robert Moevs (1920-2007), husband of noted archaeologist and Rutgers professor emerita of Classics Dr. Maria Teresa Marabini Moevs. The celebratory concert is free and open to the public.

“After serving in World War II as a pilot in the United States Air Force, Moevs’ formative years were spent in Europe… In close contact with the tightly-structured works of Boulez, and stunned by the raw sound of Edgar Varèse, Moevs synthesized these styles into what he termed ‘systematic chromaticism’.” [Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Classical Musicians]. Continue reading

New Brunswick NJ hosts CAAS 2016 meeting 20-22 Oct, and Rutgers Classics is most definitely showing up

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When it comes to CAAS 2016, all roads lead to New Brunswick

It’s that time again—for one of the most rewarding of academic conferences, the annual fall meeting of the Classical Association of the Atlantic States (CAAS). It all goes down this week with panels, paper sessions, and a performance packed into a very full program on Friday 21 and Saturday 22 October. The location is New Brunswick NJ, at the sleek Heldrich Hotel and Conference Center (10 Livingston Avenue).

As CAAS itself describes it, these “meetings combine scholarly papers on ancient literature, history and archaeology with panels and presentations on the teaching of the Classics, providing a relaxed and enjoyable forum for all college and secondary school teachers who are interested in the Greco-Roman world.”

This year marks the seventh time New Brunswick has hosted the event, but the first in more than a dozen years. (Since its founding in 1907, CAAS has chosen the city as a meeting location in 1923, 1959, 1978, 1983, 1995 and 2002.) The 2016 meeting promises to be a Rutgers reunion of sorts. Spotted on the program alone are about a dozen and a half current and past Rutgers Classics students and faculty. You can see the full program here and an abridged and RU-annotated schedule below. Continue reading

RU Libraries, Art Museum and Classics stage ‘Counterfeit Caesars’ exhibition on master Roman coin forgeries

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This just in—reposting a welcome press release from Rutgers University Libraries…

“The United States Department of Treasury estimates that about $70 million dollars in counterfeit currency is currently in circulation. Counterfeit money is a tremendous problem in modern economies, but it is not a new problem by any stretch of the imagination.

This month, Rutgers University Libraries, the Zimmerli Art Museum, and the Rutgers University–New Brunswick Department of Classics are teaming up on a display of counterfeit coins from the Ernst Badian Collection of Roman Republican Coins. Counterfeit Caesars: The Criminal Genius of Coin Forger Carl Wilhelm Becker (1772–1830) will be on display through February 6, 2017 at the Zimmerli Art Museum in the Class of 1937 Study Gallery (71 Hamilton Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901).”

Here is the catalogue to the exhibition:

“While the gallery is dedicated to showcasing works that supplement Rutgers academic courses, it is open to all visitors. Currently, the Study Gallery also includes a display of American prints and an ACT UP Art Box.

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‘Counterfeit Caesars’ on display at the Zimmerli. Credit: Tim Corlis

Continue reading

Fresh quarters for RU Classics, in new Academic Building atop historic “Holy Hill”

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The new Rutgers Academic Building, now the home of RU Classics—6th floor, 15 Seminary Place, New Brunswick NJ. Credit: DEVCO

Two hundred forty years ago—in December 1776, during the American Revolution—the British sited their artillery on this hill during their occupation of New Brunswick.

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One hundred sixty years ago—in 1856—the New Brunswick Theological Seminary chose the same height for its grand Hertzog Hall, thereby making the hill “holy”.

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Fifty years ago—in 1966—Hertzog inexplicably fell victim to the wrecking ball, and an architectural monstrosity, Zwemer Hall (charitably known as “The Dixie Cup”) rose up on Holy Hill in its place.

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And now on 6 September 2016, on this same elevation Rutgers has opened its $116 million, 175,000 square-foot Academic Building. It serves as new home to its School of Arts and Sciences and a number of SAS departments—including Classics. It marks the first new academic facility on the Rutgers College Avenue Campus since the 1960s.

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For Rutgers Classics, it meant saying goodbye to its home (of half a century or so) in the Ruth Adams Building of beloved Douglass Campus, and setting up shop at the following new address:

Department of Classics, Rutgers Academic Building, Room 6183

15 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, NJ 08901

Tel. 848-932-8223, e-mail classics@rci.rutgers.edu Continue reading

RU Classics grad student (and Cook Scholarship holder) Emmanuel Aprilakis reflects on 2016 ASCSA summer program in Greece

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The Palamidi Fortress in Nafplio. Credit (for this and all photos): Emmanuel Aprilakis

Emmanuel Aprilakis is much looking forward to his second year as a graduate student in the Rutgers Classics department, having earned his B.A. summa cum laude from the Macaulay Honors College at CUNY Hunter College in 2015. He is mainly interested in Greek literature and religion with a focus on Attic drama. Emmanuel’s broader research interests include ancient epic, comparative mythology, ancient athletics, sculpture, vase painting, and museum ethics.

This summer, thanks to the generosity of Rutgers Classics’ Ethel S. Cook Travel Scholarship, Emmanuel participated in the Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. We asked Emmanuel a few questions about his experience in Greece this summer. Continue reading

RU Classics grad student Alicia Matz takes department’s Cook Travel Scholarship to Rome

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Roman Forum, looking E from the Tabularium. Credit: Alicia Matz

Alicia Matz is entering her second year in the Rutgers Classics graduate program, having earned a 2015 BA in Classics from the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma WA). Her research interests encompass both the Greek and Roman worlds, ranging from Aristophanic comedy, to Augustan literature and material culture, to reception of the classical past, especially in science fiction and fantasy literature.

This summer, thanks to the generosity of Rutgers Classics’ Ethel S. Cook Travel Scholarship, Alicia participated in the Classical Summer School of the American Academy in Rome. We asked Alicia a few questions about her Italy summer experience. Continue reading