Taking stock of a unique collaboration in Rome: Rutgers Classics remembers HSH Prince Nicolò Boncompagni Ludovisi (1941-2018)

Excerpt from unpublished letter of Marie Antoinette congratulating Ignazio Boncompagni Ludovisi on his elevation to Cardinal, written at Versailles 12 October 1775. Collection of HSH Prince Nicolò and HSH Princess Rita Boncompagni Ludovisi, Rome.

Since 2013, students at Rutgers-New Brunswick have enjoyed an extraordinary opportunity to “do history” by working with digitized pages of primary documents (dating from 1400-1940) belonging to the Papal family of the Boncompagni Ludovisi.

So it is with great sadness that Rutgers Classics reports the death of the head of family, HSH Prince Nicolò Francesco Boncompagni Ludovisi, aged 77, on 8 March 2018, at his ancestral home of the Casino Aurora in Rome. Trained as a chemical engineer at ETH Zurich and fluent in seven languages, Prince Nicolò possessed a dazzling knowledge of European history and enthusiastically encouraged Rutgers’ efforts to delve into a topic in which he had unparalleled expertise and passion—the architecture, art and archives of the Boncompagni Ludovisi.

Photographed at the Casino Aurora in 2010: HSH Prince Nicolò Boncompagni Ludovisi, Rome 1941-Rome 2018.

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To study Classics at Cambridge, Michael Antosiewicz ’18 wins coveted Gates Scholarship

Michael Antosiewicz ’18 discusses his research with VP for Undergraduate Education and Professor Emeritus of English Barry V. Qualls (left) in April 2016

Michael Antosiewicz ’18, who will graduate from the School of Arts and Sciences in Rutgers-New Brunswick with a double major in Classics (Greek and Latin concentration) and History and a minor in Philosophy, is one of just 35 US students this year to be newly awarded a scholarship for graduate study at Cambridge University by the Gates Cambridge Trust. Starting this fall, Michael will pursue a M.Phil. degree in Classics at Cambridge’s Sidney Sussex College under the direction of Kennedy Professor of Latin Stephen Oakley.  You can see the 16 February 2018 announcement of the new class of Gates Cambridge Scholars here.

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For RU Classics major Molly Kuchler ’18, a capstone semester at the ‘Centro’ in Rome

Founded in 1965, the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies (‘Centro’) is situated on Via Algardi in Rome’s leafy Monteverde neighborhood. Credit: Google Maps

Molly Kuchler ’18 will graduate this May from Rutgers-New Brunswick with a major in Classics (Greek and Latin option) and a minor in Religion. After graduation, Molly hopes to attend graduate school to study ancient history and eventually teach at the college or university level. She is an alumna of the Rutgers Archaeological Field School in Vacone, Italy (2016 season), a member of Eta Sigma Phi (national Classics honor society), and—most recently (fall 2017)—has spent a semester at the highly selective Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome (affectionately known as the Centro). We caught up with Molly to ask her about some of her experiences this past fall as a student in Italy.

RUTGERS CLASSICS: How did your semester at the Centro fit into your Rutgers academic trajectory?

MOLLY KUCHLER: “My time in Italy at the Centro last semester was really a capstone-like experience in my undergraduate career. I saw so many amazing places and objects that I never dreamed that I would see in person, let alone listen to a lecture in front of! The depth and breadth of the program brought the Roman and at times Greek world to life in a way I didn’t know I was missing out on beforehand. The program itself took all of the students and professors everywhere from the Etruscan tombs of Tarquinia (north of Rome) to the southern tip of Sicily and innumerable places in between.” Continue reading

Going to Boston for the 2018 SCS/AIA? Here’s the (long) list of Rutgers papers and panels

Entrance arches, Boston Public Library, after 1903

If it’s the first weekend in January, it means that the Society for Classical Studies is holding its annual joint meeting with the Archaeological Institute of America. This year it all goes down in Boston’s Back Bay, at the Marriott Copley Place, starting Thursday 4 January and running through Sunday 7 January.

The list of sessions for the SCS and the AIA are fully online. But to cut to the chase: here’s an overview of the Rutgers Classics (and Art History) presence at the meetings, with links to abstracts, as available. Of particular note is the fact that six current Rutgers Classics graduate students are delivering papers. With a bit of luck—the last two are in concurrent sessions—maybe you can get to them all! Continue reading

RU’s David Wright traces the origins of the new Multiculturalism, Race & Ethnicity in Classics Consortium (MRECC)

October 2016 saw the founding of a new professional organization within the field of ancient Mediterranean studies. The acronym is MRECC: Multiculturalism, Race & Ethnicity in Classics Consortium.

Nemrut Dağ (Turkey): the tomb-sanctuary of Antiochus I (69–34 BCE) of Commagene. Credit: Bill Ray/LIFE/Google Arts & Culture

The goal of MRECC? To promote and support the study of multiculturalism, race, and ethnicity in classics and classical archaeology—at all levels. How? By facilitating discussion and establishing a supportive network of international scholars, who approach these questions from any number of perspectives, including those of classical languages, literatures, material culture, and pedagogy. An additional, important aim is to increase the diversity of students, staff, and faculty within the professional world of Classics. Continue reading

For innovative teaching in NJ prisons, RU Classics prof Emily Allen-Hornblower wins inaugural Chancellor’s Award for Faculty Excellence

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Professor Emily Allen-Hornblower accepts the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence from Rutgers-New Brunswick Chancellor Richard L. Edwards

Here’s another great Rutgers Classics first. Honored in the inaugural group of seven recipients of Rutgers New Brunswick’s important new faculty award—the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence—is Associate Professor in Classics Emily Allen-Hornblower.

In a ceremony Tuesday 4 October 2016, Chancellor Richard L. Edwards recognized Professor Allen-Hornblower in the category of Excellence in Service.

In presenting the award, Edwards cited “her heartfelt conviction that the Classics are of significance to people in all life situations and her dedication to bringing her scholarship beyond the university classroom to new audiences through her participation in the New Jersey Scholarship and Transformative Education in Prisons program (NJ-STEP)”. Continue reading

On Sunday 13 November, a celebration of composer and Rutgers professor Robert Moevs (1920-2007)

the-legacy-of-robert-moevs

On Sunday 13 November, Mortensen Hall on our Douglass Campus is the venue for a celebration of composer Robert Moevs (1920-2007), husband of noted archaeologist and Rutgers professor emerita of Classics Dr. Maria Teresa Marabini Moevs. The celebratory concert is free and open to the public.

“After serving in World War II as a pilot in the United States Air Force, Moevs’ formative years were spent in Europe… In close contact with the tightly-structured works of Boulez, and stunned by the raw sound of Edgar Varèse, Moevs synthesized these styles into what he termed ‘systematic chromaticism’.” [Baker’s Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Classical Musicians]. Continue reading