On 25 October 2012, Rutgers Classics GSA presents Johns Hopkins’ Richard Bett on Sextus Empiricus

Decorative detail from the 1621 Chouet edition of Sextus Empiricus 

The Rutgers Classics Graduate Student Association is pleased to invite the world to the third installment of its 2012/3 lecture series. It takes place this Thursday 25 October 2012 at 6:00 pm in the Douglass Campus Center, Meeting Room E.

The speaker is Professor Richard Bett of Johns Hopkins University, whose lecture is entitled “The Pyrrhonist’s Dilemma: What to Write if You Have Nothing to Say.” It concerns Sextus Empiricus and methods of writing. You can find a version of this paper on “the Pyrrhonist’s Dilemma” on Professor Bett’s website.

Richard Bett’s research interests focus on ancient Greek philosophy, with a particular focus on ethics and epistemology. He is the author of Pyrrho, his Antecedents and his Legacy (2000), and of translations of Sextus Empiricus’ Against the Ethicists (1997, with introduction and commentary), Against the Logicians (2005, with introduction and notes), and Against the Physicists (2012, with introduction and notes; click here for the UK, here for the US publication). He is also the editor of The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism (2010).

Betts’ shorter publications have been especially on ancient Greek skepticism (sometimes including comparisons with modern approaches to skepticism), but also include papers on the Stoics, Socrates, Plato, the Sophists and Nietzsche. From January 2000 to June 2001 he was Acting Executive Director of The American Philosophical Association, and since 2003 he has been Secretary-Treasurer of its Eastern Division.

RU Classics graduate students Scott Barnard and Nicole Freeto organized the event for the Classics GSA. You can view a list of some forthcoming GSA-sponsored lectures (through April 2013) here. See you  Thursday 25 October!

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